We are spread out in different corners of the world but our hearts have never left Mexico. We are committed to the conservation of nectar feeding bats and ensuring their populations stay connected. Here's what we have been doing to achieve our goal:

 

 

Changes in the microbiome

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Luis R. Viquez is based in Germany. He is pursuing a PhD in Biology at Ulm University. He is studying the diversity of the microbiota in nectar feeding bats. He is using next generation sequencing to characterize their diet and understand how it changes depending on the time and place. His research will shed light on how the microbiome is associated to migration. Click here to learn more.

 

MOTHER - PUP RECOGNITION

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Begona Inarritu is based in Mexico. She is finishing her undergraduate studies at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She is studying the behaviour of females and newborns and the dynamics of bat nurseries. Her research will shed light into how females are able to recognize their own kin among thousands of pups. Click here to learn more.

 

Population Dynamics

Ana Ibarra is based in Mexico City. She is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She is interested in the population dynamics of the greater long nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis). Click here to learn more.

 

Historical and present distribution

Roberto Trejo is based in Mexico. He is pursuing a PhD in Biology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He is studying how historical processes determined the current distribution of nectar feeding bats.  He is using genetics to understand how populations are connected and how to better maintain this genetic flow. Click here to learn more.

Population census

Dr. Rodrigo A. Medellin, A.K.A The Batman of Mexico, is professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He leads the annual population monitoring of the tequila bats and has been working on a 'Bat friendly' stamp that will ensure these bats keep pollinating Agave plants used in the production of tequila and mezcal. To learn more click here.

 

Migratory routes 

Maria Clara Arteaga is a researcher at the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education in Ensenada, Mexico. Her research is evaluating the phylogeographic structure of the bats and the gene flow across the Baja California peninsula. She is exploring how to better connect pupulations between Mexico and Southern US. Click here to learn more.